Low FODMAP diet

Recent research at Monash university has shown that that a group of small carbohydrates in the diet can be poorly absorbed in the small bowel in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

These fermentable sugars called FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligo- saccharides, Di-saccharides, Mono-saccharides and Polyols) can travel into the large bowel where they are fermented by bacteria that are naturally present. This process can cause symptoms such as gas, wind, pain, bloating, diarrhoea or constipation in susceptible people.

A FODMAP diet is a 3 step diet used to help manage the symptoms of medically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

The aims of the diet are to identify which foods trigger symptoms and how much of them can be tolerated. to assess whether IBS symptoms are improved with low FODMAP.

           The low FODMAP diet  is not a diet for life, but a test diet.

The aims of the diet are to  assess whether IBS symptoms are improved with low FODMAP, to identify which foods trigger symptoms and how much of them can be tolerated.

A FODMAP diet should be followed under the guidance of a dietitian who has specialty skills in managing IBS and using a FODMAP diet.

Mariame Iraki is a Monash FODMAP Trained Dietitian and can help you managing your IBS and using a low FODMAP diet.

Please note, 1 of 4 IBS sufferers don’t respond to low FODMAP and would need to consider other therapies.

It is  also very important that before you start a low FODMAP diet you see your doctor to exclude coeliac disease or other bowel diseases.

       

          References and  recommended websites